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CN 2020June14 Coronavirus Update - NYTimes

Coronovirus Updates - New York Times

June 15, 2020

Mixed messages come all over. The New York times has interactive pages that show daily updated information. As noted in by the publication, information comes from government reporting agencies, and the information may be dated, underreported or inaccurate for any number of reasons. Regardless, trends are important indicators of activity, and they can be used when deciding whether to travel to Mexico or not.

The most recent graphic trends of the cumulative number of active cases, the number of active cases by day and the number of deaths by day as of June 15, 2020 appear below:


New Reported Cases in Mexico - June 15, 2020


New Reported Deaths in Mexico - June 15, 2020


Cumulative Active Cases in Mexico - June 15, 2020

Following is an article published on June 14, 2020 in the New York Times. Keep the link and check it frequently for updates. Also, you can follow activity in your state or other countries you may be interested in.

The data appears to be moving in the right direction. But experts seem to believe the trends will move upward, which we all hope does not happen. Keep in touch, and stay safe. This too shall pass....

Mexico Coronavirus Map and Case Count


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There have been at least 142,600 cases of the coronavirus in Mexico, according to the National Agency of Science and Technology. As of Sunday morning, 16,872 people had died.

In May, the Times found that the Mexican government was not reporting hundreds, possibly thousands, of deaths from the coronavirus in Mexico City, according to officials and confidential data.

Earlier this week, the total number of reported cases and deaths increased significantly as the government added thousands of new cases to its historical data. Officials may revise historical data as more case details become known. The Times has made these historical revisions to the data on this page through June 3.
Reported cases in Mexico


Source: Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (National Agency of Science and Technology) of Mexico.
About this data:
The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by county. For total cases and deaths: Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness. For per capita: Parts of a county with a population density lower than 10 people per square mile are not shaded.

Here’s how the number of cases and deaths are growing in Mexico:

Reported cases by state:
StateCum CasesPer 100,000DeathsPer 100,000
Mexico City
35,954
403
3,698
41
State of Mexico
22,776
141
2,774
17
Baja California
6,852
207
1,455
44
Tabasco
6,479
270
726
30
Veracruz
6,245
77
999
12
Puebla
5,388
87
710
12
Sinaloa
5,366
181
861
29
Jalisco
3,880
49
317
4
Sonora
3,837
135
284
10
Michoacán
3,409
74
273
6
Guanajuato
3,367
58
184
3
Guerrero
3,259
92
546
15
Chiapas
3,143
60
300
6
Tamaulipas
2,968
86
186
5
Oaxaca
2,938
74
334
8
Hidalgo
2,675
94
430
15
Yucatán
2,487
119
243
12
Nuevo León
2,456
48
167
3
Quintana Roo
2,443
163
464
31
Chihuahua
2,222
62
457
13
Coahuila
1,909
65
129
4
Morelos
1,841
97
336
18
Tlaxcala
1,692
133
226
18
San Luis Potosí
1,650
61
89
3
Aguascalientes
1,431
109
66
5
Querétaro
1,404
69
169
8
Nayarit
985
83
113
10
Campeche
963
107
117
13
Baja California Sur
961
135
50
7
Durango
920
52
74
4
Zacatecas
514
33
59
4
Colima
276
39
36
5


The New York Times is engaged in an effort to track details about cases and deaths around the world, collecting information from local governments and other sources around the clock. The numbers in this article are being updated several times a day based on the latest information our journalists have gathered.

New York times data
New reported cases by day in Mexico

Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

Image
New reported deaths by day in Mexico


Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

About the data
Confirmed cases and deaths are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a laboratory test. Probable cases and deaths count individuals who did not have a confirmed test but were evaluated using criteria developed by national and local governments. Some governments are reporting only confirmed cases, while others are reporting both confirmed and probable numbers. And there is also another set of governments that are reporting the two types of numbers combined without providing a way to separate the confirmed from the probable. The Times is now using the total of confirmed and probable counts when they are available individually or combined. Otherwise only the confirmed count will be shown.

Governments often revise data or report a large increase in cases on a single day without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.

Tracking the Coronavirus:

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Brazil Canada France Germany
India Italy Mexico Spain
U.K. United States


Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas
California Colorado Connecticut Delaware
Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho
Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas
Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland
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South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas
Utah Vermont Virginia Washington
Washington, D.C. West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

What you can do

Experts’ understanding of how the Covid-19 works is growing. It seems that there are four factors that most likely play a role: how close you get to an infected person; how long you are near that person; whether that person expels viral droplets on or near you; and how much you touch your face afterwards.

You can help reduce your risk and do your part to protect others by following some basic steps:

Keep your distance from others. Stay at least six feet away from people outside your household as much as possible.

Wash your hands often. Anytime you come in contact with a surface outside your home, scrub with soap for at least 20 seconds, rinse and then dry your hands with a clean towel.

Avoid touching your face. The virus primarily spreads when contaminated hands touch our nose or mouth or eyes. Try to keep your hands away from your face unless you have just recently washed them.

Wear a mask outside your home. A mask protects others from any potential infection from you. The more people who wear masks, the more we all stay safer.

Here’s a complete guide on how you can prepare for the coronavirus outbreak.
We hope to travel in November, and hope to see those of you who have reservations then too. Face masking, washing hands, keeping hands from your face while out and about and keeping social distances are the best ways to protect yourself from becoming infected.
We hope you are all doing well. The Mexico sun and the spacious Vidanta facilities should be beneficial to all who are able to travel. Stay well....
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